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Conference – History of the Knights Templar and how they were reorganized into the Portuguese Knights of Christ

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We have received the following message from dear Br+ Bryant Jones, GP USA of the OSMTJ.

“I’ve been asked to speak on the “History of the Knights Templar and how they were reorganized into the Portuguese Knights of Christ” at the Dighton Rock Museum in Berkeley, Massachusetts. Please see the pictures below for the inside and outside of this wonderful museum.  The Dighton Rock is significant for us because when the member of the Portuguese Knights of Christ named Miguel Corte-Real was sailing the coast of Massachusetts in 1511, he stopped to sign this rock and carve into it the symbol for the Knights of Christ.  As you are aware, the Knights of Christ originated from the Knights Templar.

All of you are invited and I begin speaking at 1pm this Sunday August 13th.  (The vast majority of you live far away and I don’t expect you to drive all that way for a 1 hour presentation).

Directions:  Please follow the directions to Dighton Rock State Park listed on their website: https://m.facebook.com/FriendsOfDightonRockMuseum/

If any of you would be willing to share the link about this event from their above Facebook page, I would be grateful to you.

God bless,

Bryant Jones

Grand Prior OSMTJ-USA

www.TheKnightsTemplar.org

 

Dear Br+ Jones, please send us a text with your speach. We would love to publish it!

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Crusader wreck tells tale of Crusader Holy Land conquest

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CHRISTIAN knights and Mameluke warriors were fighting on the walls. Now the wreck of a 13th century ship reveals the desperate bid to save the Holy Land.

The port of the city of Acre was a vital lifeline for Crusader knights and settlers alike. Through it streamed European pilgrims, horses, fighting men and manufacturing goods, all vital to sustain Christianity’s tenuous hold in what would later become Palestine, Lebanon, Syria and Israel.

In return, ships carried precious cargoes of sugar, spice and exotic textiles.

But, in 1291, it all came crashing down.

The Egyptian Mameluke Sultan Al-Ashraf Khalil — leading an army of 100,000 men and horses — rolled back the Christian defences, weakened by almost two centuries of fighting to maintain control over the Holy Land.

European interest was failing — despite efforts by Pope Gregory X to summon reinforcements. And the militant orders — international organisations of warrior-monks — established to defend the Holy Land had become engrossed by their own wealth and the games of thrones back home.

What support did arrive for those few on the front line was invariably too little, too late.

Eventually, the European knights fell back to their final fortress — the city of Acre.

Here, besieged, they were totally reliant on support from the sea.

Gold Crusader florins found in Acre harbour by diving archaeologists. Picture: Israel Antiquities Authority Source:Supplied

REVEALING WRECK

According to the news service Haaretz, a Crusader-era shipwreck recently found in the bay of Acre has been dated to the time of the desperate last stand by a handful of knights and mercenaries on the walls of the city.

Acre is now part of northern Israel.

The wreck had been severely damaged by dredging. But parts of the timber hull, including its keel, survived.

Excavation work began last year.

The wood has been carbon-dated between 1062-1250, which neatly brackets the Crusader era.

But archaeologists led by Doctor Ehud Galili and Professor Michal Artzy of Haifa University have uncovered traces of its cargo — and a stash of 30 gold florins.

These narrow its date down to that of the final siege of the nearby city.

Fragments of ceramics, including jugs and bowls, reveal the ship was carrying imports from Cyprus and Italy. There are also rusted remains of a few metallic objects, including anchors.

It is possible the wreck may have belonged to King Henry II of Cyprus who had reportedly sent a force of 40 ships filled with reinforcements. Just one month later, King Henry’s forces would retreat by sea as the city fell.

URGENT EVACUATION

Historic records of the disaster tell the tale of fleeing nobles attempting to bribe boat and ship owners for safe passage out of the Middle East. But few managed to make their way on-board.

A handful of Templar, Teutonic and Hospitaller warrior-monks fought stoically to buy time for the civilian population, but were eventually forced back to their strongholds after the city’s walls collapsed.

But, by May 18, the Grand Masters of the Hospitallers and Teutonic Knights had fled. The Grand Master of the Templars had been killed. Only a few equipped and trained knights remained alive.

Defeat, they knew, was inevitable.

The last stand was fought in a Templar tower at the very edge of the sea. Accounts tell of the city’s inhabitants throwing themselves into the harbour in a desperate bid to reach the departing ships.

The Templar knights were only overcome when Mameluke engineers undermined their fortress’ walls. Among the rubble were 100 of the Sultan’s best men who had been inside, fighting the Crusaders hand-to-hand.

Western Christianity would never again establish a firm foothold in the Middle East. After repeated attempts to mobilise yet another crusade, the Templars were accused of witchcraft and homosexuality in an effort by French King Philip IV to seize their wealth. The order was eventually disbanded, and its key officers burnt at the stake.

The Hospitallers retreated to Rhodes, where they established a navy in anticipation of a fresh crusade. The Teutonic Knights shifted the focus of their holy war to the Baltics.

The entire city of Acre was levelled, and left abandoned until rebuilt nearly three hundred years later.

in news.com.au

Cornish church saved from ruin

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With the heavy rain proving the church roof is now definitely watertight, a small gathering greet the grant representatives from Listed Places of Worship Roof Repair Fund which contributed over £70,000 towards the costs of re-roofing and repairs. From left: Archdeacon of Bodmin Ven Audrey Elkington, roof repair fund programme manager Sarah Palmer and grants officer Sarah Drewell, roof and tower restoration project team members Laurence Harvey, Richard Cavin and David Attwell. Picture: Peter Glaser

A CORNISH church founded by the Knights Templar has been saved from ruin thanks to nearly £90,000 of grants and huge efforts from the local community.

St Catherine’s Church lies in the wild hamlet of Temple on Bodmin Moor. It has had a chequered history from its origins as an outpost for the secretive medieval order of the Knights Templar to its reputation in the 18th century as the Gretna Green of the South West.

Now, after 12 weeks of construction and over 18 months of planning, this historic church has been restored to glory. It was the 2015 quinquennial survey that reported the church roof as ‘nailsick’ and the resulting water damage meant that the church’s days were numbered. The village community rallied and in partnership with Blisland Parochial Church Council secured the funding, planning consents and contractors to bring the church back from the brink.

The Listed Places of Worship: Roof Repair Fund came to Temple’s aid with a grant of £70,300, which together with £10,000 from the National Churches Trust and another £5,000 each from the Cornwall Historic Churches Trust and the Blisland and Temple Preservation Society put the project to save the church well on its way.

The final funds were all thanks to the Blisland PCC, the Scottish Knights Templars and the Headley Trust along with local fundraising events and concerts.

Karen Dickin, chair of the Temple village sub-group, said: “It’s been a real team effort. So many individuals have pledged their time and expertise to make this happen and the result has been the rescue of a church that is our best and only community asset.”

All-in-all it’s taken over £117,000 to complete the works. This has paid for contractors W R Bedford to re-roof the entire building, install a new drainage system and complete crucial timber repairs to the structure itself. The sensitive reuse of the original ‘fishtail’ slates means that the church retains its old world charm, and the scheduling of works and choice of materials has meant that the three resident colonies of bats have been left unharmed. The church is many things to many people — a place of calm and refuge, a centre of the community, a touchstone to history. Thanks to this project the church can continue to be all those things for many years to come.

in camelford-today.co.uk

Shroud of Turin ‘stained with blood from torture victim’, find researchers

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The Shroud of Turin is stained with the blood of a torture victim, scientists have claimed.

Analysis of the linen cloth, purportedly used to bury Jesus after his crucifixion, contains “nanoparticles” of blood which are not typical of that of a healthy person, according to researchers.

Institute of Crystallography researcher Elvio Carlino, one of the authors of the report, said the particles are conducive with someone having been through “great suffering”.

“Our results point out that at the nanoscale a scenario of violence is recorded in the funeral fabric,” authors wrote in the scientific article, published in PLOS One.

“The consistent bound of ferritin iron to creatinine occurs in human organism in case of a severe polytrauma.”

Researchers believe the particles show a “peculiar structure, size and distribution”, which corroborates the theory that it was used as a burial cloth.

They also believe it contradicts previous theories that the shroud was made in medieval times.

Professor Giulio Fanti, one of the author’s of the research, said: “The presence of these biological nanoparticles found during our experiments point to a violent death for the man wrapped in the Turin Shroud.”

The cloth’s authenticity is highly contentious and divides religious opinion.

Some Christians believe the fabric – which is kept in the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin – is the burial shroud of Jesus of Nazereth, dating back over 2,000 years.

But previous scientific studies have suggested the cloth, which appears to be imprinted with the face of a man, may in fact be from the 13th or 14th century – centuries after Jesus is believed to have died.

One study found the cloth had been manufactured in India.

The research was published in US scientific journal PlosOne and is titled: “New Biological Evidence from Atomic Resolution Studies on the Turin Shroud.”

in independent.co.uk

Festa de São João e Novas Comendadorias em Portugal

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Celebrou-se no passado dia 24 de Junho de 2017 em Arraiolos mais uma importante data na história do Priorado Ibérico da OSMTHU, a comemoração da Festa da Luz, de São João Baptista.

Este ano a alegria foi maior porque a Ordem estabeleceu nesse dia 3 novas Comendadorias, recebendo ainda um número significativo de Escudeiros que assim iniciam os seus estudos mais aprofundados no ideal da Cavalaria Espiritual Lusitana, depois de um período como Noviços em que tiveram a oportunidade de se familiarizar com os princípios da Cavalaria universal.

A festa iniciou-se a meio da tarde com um convívio típico, onde não faltaram as tradicionais sardinhas e o churrasco, em que participaram todos os irmãos e irmãs, bem como as famílias, vindos de várias partes do país, alguns percorrendo largas centenas de quilómetros, outros vindo logo dali do lado.

Ao final da tarde o Comendador Rui Herdadinha teve a oportunidade de lembrar algumas das lendas de Arraiolos, nomeadamente da cabeça da Igreja do Convento de Nossa Senhora da Assunção, onde iriam decorrer as cerimónias. Após uma rápida visita ao Castelo, a tempo de apreciar o por do sol alentejano que já é bem familiar aos membros mais antigos da Ordem, rumou-se ao Convento para iniciar a parte litúrgica do dia.

A Ordem reuniu em Capítulo Nacional, presidido pelo Grão Prior Geral. Após algumas curtas comunicações, em que se recordou a passagem dos Irmãos Ronald Cappello e Fernando de Toro-Garland, duas figuras incontornáveis para a Ordem a nível internacional, mas particularmente para o Priorado português, os Comendadores tiveram a oportunidade de informar o Prior e a congregação do decorrer dos seus projectos, os quais começam a ganhar ritmo e permitem prever um ano de 2017 / 2018 muito frutuoso.

Procedeu-se então à cerimónia de investidura das Comendadorias. Tratando-se de um encargo da Ordem sobre um Irmão, o ritual, apesar de simples, é carregado de significado e levado a cabo tal como o era na idade média, com igual intensidade e solenidade. Estabelece-se um vínculo pessoal e de confiança, mais que um laço, uma verdadeira atadura, cujo rompimento representaria o ato simbólico contra-iniciático correspondente e a correspondente punição in ordine e in theatrum mundi. Não é coisa para levar de ânimo leve.

Foram então investidos em funções o Comendador de Lisboa, das Chagas, Irmão Luis Fonseca, KCOT; o Comendador de Laccobriga, Irmão Vitor Varela Martins, KCTJ e o Comendador do Condado de Arraiolos, Irmão Rui Herdadinha, KCTJ.

O Comendador de Lisboa, das Chagas, recebe a investidura

O Comendador de Laccobriga recebe a sua investidura

O Comendador de Arraiolos recebe a investidura

Finalmente procedeu-se à recepção de Escudeiros, cerimónia que remete para uma série de leituras de carácter instrutório e lendário, rematada pelo compromisso de serviço e o vestir da Alba, primeira veste na Ordem.

A Ordem agradece à Pousada do Convento de Nossa Senhora da Assunção, na pessoa do seu Director, a amabilidade com que nos acolheram. A Ordem agradece ainda publicamente ao Comendador Rui Herdadinha e sua família pelo seu empenho, bem como a todos os Irmãos e Irmãs que contribuíram decisivamente para uma festa cuja recordação será difícil esquecer, quer tenha sido com o seu trabalho e dedicação (não faltaram comida, bebida e sobremesas), quer tenha sido pela sua alegre presença. Por sua causa, o dia mais longo do ano foi um Dia Maior.

A presente estrutura do Priorado nacional é hoje a que está expressa no seguinte gráfico.

In Memory of Fernando de Toro-Garland, Master of the Temple

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It’s with great sadness that in this Pentecost Celebration the Order finds the Chair in the East empty, with the passing of our beloved Brother and Master of the Temple, Fernando de Toro-Garland.

We have indeed lost one of the brightest and most brilliant lights that have shone in our Temple in the last few decades. To the widow, our beloved Sister Patricia Oyarzun, a true life companion and tireless supporter – without whom Fr+ Fernando’s love for the Order and talent as a prolific author would not become so accomplished – our condolences and respect.

Master Fernando was born in 1925 in Santiago do Chile. In 1946 he would complete one of his many Degrees in subjects such as Humanities, Philosophy and Law, becoming a member of the Illustrious Bar Association in Madrid in 1957 and later on college professor in Literature and Law in many universities (Virginia, Columbia, Rutgers, Pontifícia Universidad Católica, UNED, etc.).

Fernando de Toro-Garland, the Templar

Photo: Celebration of the Battle of Ourique, homage to Afonso Henriques, Portugal, 2004. Left to right: Fr+ Ulisses Rolim, KTJ; Fr+ Antonio Paris, Master; Sr+ Patrícia Oyarzun, DCTJ; Fr+ Luis de Matos, Prior GP Portugal; SAR Dom Duarte de Bragança, Fr+ Fernando de Toro-Garland, Master Emeritus; Dom Nuno da Camara Pereira, Comendador-Mor da Ordem de São Miguel da Ala, Fr+ Nuno Silva, KTJ, Fr+ Ricardo Centenera Villena, KTJ; Fr+ Artur Batista, KTJ

In 1985 Fr+ Fernando was knighted in the Grand Priory of Scotland, rapidly ascending to the position of Grand Prior of Spain in 1988. By then his devotion to the Order and excellent skills as a strategist and the ardent desire for a united Templar organization were a transformative force that proved to be unstoppable. That year a group of Authonomous Priories, that descended from the noble lineage of Fr+ Anton Luprecht’s 1940’s Priory of Switzerland, formed the International Federative Alliance (IFA) in order to established the principles of recognition between Priories of the Order that worked within certain valid Templar guidelines.

Under Fr+ Fernando’s leadership the IFA grew in numbers and authority. The ideas put forth by Fr+ Fernando inspired many others to follow along similar lines and a few of the most thriving branches of the Order worldwide today owe him a dept they don’t even understand. Visionary, relentless, he knew how to command an audience and be heard. He knew what he wanted, how he wanted what he wanted and was able to inspire others to provide it. Like all brilliant minds, he had little tolerance for mediocrity and no tolerance at all – if not utter contempt – for lack of discipline and lack of loyalty.

In 1999 the 23 Priories that were part of the IFA elected Fernando de Toro-Garland as Master of the Ordo Supremus Militaris Templi Heirosolimitani, that, in respect for his values and objectives, added the word “Universalis” for the new century, creating the OSMTHU. Master Fernando took his vows from Fr+ Luis de Matos, Prior of Portugal, in the Aula Magna of the Lawyers College of Alcalá de Henares, Spain, birthplace of his beloved Miguel de Cervantes. And the Don Quixote reference is not in vain, as Dom Fernando was a fighter and a man that saw what others only barely imagined, sometimes being mistook for a dreamer when in fact he was frequently a thinker way before his time. His election, that did not fall from heaven in a tidy basket, was the result of many years of good labor by many workers. It was the first time since the mid-nineteenth century that a Templar Master was elected in universally free elections, audited by an external Chartered Auditor (located in the Isle of Man).

In 2004 he would complete his (literal) pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostella as Master Templi and, as a humble pilgrim, in his high Office, pass his Mastership to his elected successor Master Antonio Paris.

Sometimes I’m asked about the “true Templars” and an “inner Order”. If indeed there is any sign of the former or veil for the latter, we have just lost one of the greatest references for this theme in the transition between the 20th and 21th century.

It was privilege to work with you, Master Fernando.

Ora pro nobis

Eques ad Flammula Veritatis

PS: Maybe the greatest homage we can make to a writer is to read some of his texts. Here’s a link to one of his articles about the Celestina (“Libro del Buen Amo”). [PDF – Spanish]

In Memory of Patriarch Ronald V. Cappello, Tau Michael (I)

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Ronald V. Cappello, age 65, of Yonkers died Wednesday, November 30, 2016. Ronald was born April 23, 1951 in Mt.Vernon, NY the son of the late Joseph and Marie (Papaleo) Cappello. Ronald was a graduate of Iona College with a Masters Degree in both Science and Art. He was a History teacher for the Yonkers Board of Education.

Ronald was a devoted Mason serving as Sovereign Grand Master of the Ancient and Primitive Right of Memphis-Misraim, a member of the Hugnat Lodge #46 F.&A.M. for 34 years, he was also a member of the Bethlehem Crusader Knights Templar, the Royal Arch Masons, the Cryptic Masons, the Grand College of Rites of the USA, the Royal Order of Scotland, the Rosicrucian Order and the Knights Templar Order of the Temple. He was Past Grad Master of the Martinist Order of the Temple and a representative for the Grand Lodge of Western Australia.

He is survived by his beloved wife MaryLou (Capone) Cappello, his daughters Robin Foti-Nadzam, Victoria Cunningham and Yvonne Foti, his grandchildren Alora Gerace, Kyra Nadzam and William Vanderlinden. Also surviving are his sisters Susan DeLorenzo and Frances Shikarides, his sister-in-law, Marion LaGrotte and 8 nieces and nephews.

Published in the The Journal News on Dec. 2, 2016

Note: The Templar Globe will publish two more remembrance articles on Brother Ronald Cappello in the next few days.