Templar Sites

Abre al público el edificio islámico más completo de Toledo, el Museo Casa del Temple

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El próximo 30 de agosto abrirá al público el Museo Casa del Temple en Toledo, una nueva oferta turística que sumará riqueza patrimonial y que permitirá conocer un Bien de Interés Cultural considerado la casa islámica más completa que existe hoy en día en la ciudad.

Tal y como publica en su cuenta de Facebook el Museo Casa del Temple, el objetivo es convertir este espacio en un centro cultural, en sala de exposiciones, gastrobar y en lugar de eventos. Además, allí se expondrán un conjunto de piezas arqueológicas aparecidas en la casa, otras piezas de colecciones privadas, así como un 3D con el que entender la edificación en su origen.

La actividad expositiva comenzará con una muestra del artista chileno afincado en España Guillermo Muñoz Vera.

La Casa del Temple en Toledo data de los siglos XI-XII, perteneciendo a esta época la estructura general, típicamente andalusí, sustentada por las bóvedas del sótano y organizada en torno al patio. Diversas fuentes coinciden en señalar que el inmueble fue, en tiempos, propiedad de la Orden de los Templarios, a los que probablemente les donase el edificio Alfonso VIII para recabar su apoyo a las diversas campañas militares del monarca.

Enclavada en pleno Casco Histórico, justo al lado de San Miguel el Alto, sus alfarjes fueron restaurados en 2017 por el Consorcio de la ciudad, entrando a formar parte de las rutas del patrimonio desconocido.

Bien de Interés Cultural con la categoría de monumento desde 2002, el patio interior de la planta baja comunica con las cuatro crujías que definen el inmueble. Lo que vemos a nuestro alrededor son un arco de medio punto decorado con yeserías mudéjares y, ojo, el forjado del techo primitivo, que se supone que es anterior a 1109 y con canes labrados en el interior del patio. Y en uno de sus laterales conserva el alfarje con las tabicas originales. A cada lado de esta entrada, dos arcos de herradura apuntados y decorado con finas yeserías.

Ya en el sótano se encuentra un salón con un zócalo decorado con pinturas y que representan arcos entrecruzados, temas vegetales y una cenefa, todo supuestamente anterior a 1109. A lo que hay su añadir la planta primera y el ático.

in encastillalamancha.es

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Rota dos Castelos Templários

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Pentecost Benedictio Militia 2018

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Come and celebrate Pentecost in a Templar way.

The 18 – 20 May 2018 the Priory of Portugal will host a three day event that includes Conferences, Debates and a full Adoubement Ceremony with Vigil and Pentecost Benedictio Militia.

Templars from any branch of the Order are invited. Most activities (except the Vigil and short private section of the ceremony) are opened to the public, subject to pre-registration. All are welcome. More details (place, times, registration, etc.) upon request.

Request your invitation today.

 https://templarsosmthu.wordpress.com/the-order/pentecost-benedictio-militia-2018/

FAQ

Q: Who is organizing this Event?
A: The Priory of Portugal of the OSMTHU

Q: Who is the OSMTHU?
A: A branch of the Palaprat Templar Order (1804) that is organized in Autonomous Priories since 1945. You can check the provenance here: https://templarsosmthu.wordpress.com/structure-and-provena…/

Q: Is this the Templar Order of the Middle Ages or a (the) right descendant lineage of that Order?
A: No. There is no such thing. The history of the Templars is fascinating, but one thing is sure: after over 900 years of its foundation and 700 years after its suspension, no single group can make such a claim with any degree of truth. There were pockets of survival at the time and we do study what became of the Order and its project across Europe, but any claim of continuity from any group should be regarded with extreme caution.

Q: So, why are you using the Order’s name and symbols?
A: For the same reason that we still have the Olympics today. For the same reason modern Universities, Academies and other Institutions draw on their Greek and Roman predecessors: the spirit is alive and the values they stood for are still valid and very much in need in today’s world. There is no linear historical flow, but the spiritual connection and ideals can be mastered and put to use. Our Order has been doing so for over 200 years and our branch for over half a century. It’s not likely we’ll stop now!

Q: Is this connected with Freemasonry?
A: No. Freemasonry is a fraternal Order that has no direct link to the 1804 revival of the Templar Order by Palaprat.

Q: I have joined the Templars in a branch different from yours. Can I attend the event?
A: Yes. We accept Registration to the Event by every Knight or Dame that can attest affiliation to a Templar inspired Order, such as OSMTJ, OSMTH, OCMTJ, OSTI, OCE, OVDT, CBCS, KT, OSMA, etc.

Q: But I am not active at the moment. Can I still attend?
A: Once Chivalry is duly transmitted, it remains active in oneself if the values are kept. We don’t want to know about current membership status in any Order. Membership is a private matter for each individual. We only need to validate that Chivalry was transmitted so that we can open the access to the private part of the ceremony to those who wish to attend it.

Q: I am not a member of any Templar Order. Can I attend?
A: The general public can Register and attend the Event. The only exception is part of the Vigil (that starts around 9pm on Saturday and ends around 8am the next morning). New Knights and Dames need to be secluded and in silence and meditation during that period. The ceremony ends with the doors of the church opened to the public and the celebration of Mass and Eucharist at 9am on Sunday.

Q: Apart from the Ceremony, what else will take place?
A: There will be a Conference and Debate on Friday night and Saturday afternoon, with several guests speaking on “Conflict and the Notion of the Just War”. There will be a Gala Lunch on Saturday where attendees, members and invited guests, will network and get to know each other. The start of the Vigil, around 6pm and up to 9pm will take place in the church and will be opened to the public. Doors close at 9pm and only Knights and Dames may remain then. Doors will reopen at 9am on Sunday allowing the public to witness the completion of the Ceremony and Mass. In all, there are three days of conferences, debates, talks and ceremonies.

Q: I’m not a member of a Templar Order. Can I become a Knight (or Dame) during the Event?
A: No. The Pentecost Benedictio Militis is a ceremony that closes a cycle that was opened when the members that are going to be Knighted were received as Novices quite a while ago. The Order is not accepting novices during Pentecost.

Q: Where will the Event take place?
A: It will take place In the country of Portugal, in a small medieval village relatively close to the capital, Lisbon.

Q: Why don’t you disclose the location?
A: To avoid unwanted attention in a very special spiritual occasion, the location is only disclosed to Registered participants. The Event will take place in a village conveniently accessible from the main Portuguese airport, featuring good accommodation and historically rich surroundings.

Q: What language will be used during the Event?
A: Portuguese and English.

Q: How much does it cost to attend?
A: Further information should be requested via email to osmthu@mail.com

A Knight’s Tale

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Paddy Houlihan from Ballybeg is maintaining and promoting an almost forgotten site of significant historic interest – the Knights Templar Graveyard, Kilbarry.

AN IMPORTANT piece of Waterford’s history and heritage is being preserved and promoted thanks to the Trojan efforts of one local man and his granddaughter.

In a fantastic display of community spirit and pride of place, Paddy Houlihan from Ballybeg Square embarked on a project to improve the condition of the Knights Templar Graveyard in Kilbarry some years ago.

Paddy had become increasingly concerned for the condition of the graveyard which is located near Lacken Road Business Park and Templars Hall.

The Knights Templar were an international military order set up to protect pilgrims travelling to the Holy Land.

They arrived in Ireland in the late 1100s after the Norman invasion of 1169-71 and the witnessing of an Irish charter by Matthew the Templar in 1177.

They fell out of favour with the King of France in 1307, were persecuted on the continent and closed down in England and Ireland.

Their estates were handed over to their rivals, the Knights Hospitaller, but Kilbarry was one of three preceptories in Ireland retained for the Templars for the remainder of their lives.

The remains of the church of St Barry are located within the Kilbarry Knights Templar Graveyard.
Beside the church, a row of mortared stone buildings with slate roofs were located along with a row of large wooden buildings, probably barns.

Records show that the church, which was located on a slope overlooking a tidal marsh that extended to the River Suir, was in good repair until 1615 when it was still in use and serving the parish. The earliest headstone in the graveyard dates back to 1598 and the latest is dated 1856.

The graveyard lay more or less idle since the mid-1800s and, in the modern era, was believed by many to have been a famine graveyard.

Paddy Houlihan says many local people, including himself and his family, have many fond memories of playing in the area. He recalls the graveyard being a favourite location in which to explore with his brothers and sisters when growing up. “Everybody around this side of the city played in the area,” he explained.

In recent years, Paddy became concerned because of the huge growths of ivy throughout the graveyard, the high grass growths, and the many overhanging trees.

Along with his granddaughter Katie (his trusted sidekick and ‘Project Manager’), they spent countless hours engaging in efforts to clean-up the graveyard. More than 40 headstones/tombstones are located in the graveyard and, during the duo’s work, five tombstones were uncovered which had been hidden in the undergrowth. All of the names on the stones have now been recorded, and the graveyard’s condition has improved immensely.

in munster-express.ie by Kieran Foley

Uncovering Templar church ruins with links back to the sixth century still hidden beneath the grounds at Glasgow Airport

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This historic gem dating as far back as the sixth century is attracting lots of interest – and it’s in the unlikeliest of places.

Fly in to Glasgow Airport and you’re likely to see the bright lights of the city to the east, the runway below – certainly a glimpse of the River Clyde winding its way through the city.

What you won’t notice as readily is a piece of history dating back to the sixth century – and the community digging deep to learn more about it. 

On a grassy patch of Glasgow Airport, right below the flight path, lies the ruins of the old All Hallows, a Templar church replaced by nearby Inchinnan Parish Church in the 1960s.

It’s now the site of an archaeological investigation, led by Inchinnan Historical Interest Group and with help from local schoolchildren.

The site is believed to be the burial place of St Conval, an early Christian saint who is said to have floated over from Ireland on a stone (more on that later) – and the earliest settlement dates back to 597 AD.

The first stone-built church, St Conval’s, dates to about 1100 – some 20 years before Glasgow Cathedral – on land then gifted by David I to the Knights Templar.

The medieval building was deemed dangerous in 1828 and replaced with a Gothic-style church, which was built around in the late 19th century to form a third church building, dedicated as All Hallows.

The foundation stone of the replacement church, in Inchinnan, was laid on November 19, 1966, with the old site making way for Glasgow Airport – although much of the old All Hallows was moved, including stunning stained glass windows, the organ and the pulpit.

The All Hallows site remained overgrown until early 2017, when Inchinnan Historical Interest Group gained help from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Historic Environment Scotland and others – including a £4,500 grant from Glasgow Airport’s Flightpath Fund.

Bill McCallum, of Inchinnan Historical Interest Group, told Glasgow Live: “We wanted to research the former site, to see if there was any evidence left of the previous buildings and, if so, what? We also knew from old maps that there were some houses around about, so we set out to find any evidence of habitation around the church in earlier days.

“We were fortunate enough to find a variety of things. Coming upon the 1904 church wasn’t a problem, but getting below that was a little difficult – but we got through and found evidence of the church demolishes in 1828.

“We’ve found a lot of stained glassed thought to be from the middle ages and they’re currently being examined by a specialist. We also found some rubble which we think is the earlier church but have not yet been able to prove that.

“it was important to use to involve the community too, and a number of local schools participated in the project.

“I think it gives people a better understanding of where they came from, from a linear point of view – but it also gives them a better appreciation for the fact that Inchinnan has been a very important area of Scotland for many, many years.”

While the archaeological dig uncovered lots of finds at the site, there was a surprise at the current church too – one which could help put the place on the tourist map and link it to another important place within the city boundary.

PhD student Megan Kasten, an expert on the Govan Stones, was asked to take a look at Inchinnan’s historic stones and unveiled her findings this month.

Using digital photography techniques on the ancient stones, Megan has revealed that one – thought to be medieval in date – was originally carved much earlier, and possibly commemorated an important person in the Kingdom of Strathclyde.

The discovery means that Inchinnan has four large carved stones characteristic of the same group of sculpture known as the ‘Govan School’ of carving.

Megan said: “This new addition is really exciting – we have few historical records for this time period, so each new discovery increases our understanding of the connections between important medieval sites like Inchinnan and Govan.”

Dr Sally Foster, lecturer in heritage and conservation at the University of Stirling and chair of the National Committee on Carved Stones in Scotland, added: “The discovery of a previously unrecognised example of the ‘Govan School’ of early medieval sculpture is a wonderful example of the untapped potential of Scotland’s carved stone resource.”

Work to find out more about the mysterious Inchinnan stones is ongoing, but the archaeological dig at All Hallows has stopped – for now.

The Historical Group hope to continue their work soon, if funding is available, and dig even deeper into the history of such an important site, right under the modern flight path many of us know so well.

Doctor Heather James, lead archaeologist from Calluna Archaeology, added: “It has been great seeing the community and professionals working together to discover so much more about our fascinating heritage throughout this project.”

in glasgowlive.co.uk by Gillian Loney

La misteriosa relación de la casa más antigua de Toledo y los templarios

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La casa del Temple, la que podría ser la casa más antigua de Toledo mejor conservada (data de los siglos XI-XII), podrá visitarse este sábado 18 de marzo de forma gratuita, tras la última restauración realizada en los alfarjes de su planta primera, compuestos por vigas «de las más antiguas de España».

La jornada gratuita de puertas abiertas forma parte del programa «Patrimonio desconocido», impulsada por el Consorcio dentro de las actividades organizadas con motivo del 30 Aniversario de Toledo Ciudad Patrimonio de la Humanidad, según ha informado el Ayuntamiento una en nota de prensa. Cada mes se visita y se da a conocer un espacio histórico rehabilitado que normalmente está cerrado al público. El último fue la fuente de Cristina Iglesias en el Convento de Santa Clara.

Rosana Rodríguez, concejala de Turismo, asegura que uno de los objetivos del 30 aniversario es abrir espacios desconocidos para «el disfrute» de los toledanos y también de los turistas y que, gracias a ello, se puede conocer una representación de la arquitectura civil de los siglos XI y XII salvada después de «tantos» siglos de historia. En este caso, la jornada de puertas abiertas se celebrará el sábado 18 de marzo, de 10:00 a 14:00 y de 16:00 a 18:00 horas, en la calle Soledad, número 2.

La cruz de Malta, en una de las ventanas de la Casa Temple
La cruz de Malta, en una de las ventanas de la Casa Temple

El Consorcio ha intervenido para llevar a cabo la restauración de los alfarjes de la planta primera que «no se habían terminado de limpiar y proteger» en la rehabilitación de 1997, en la que parte del artesonado de la Casa del Temple, según ha avanzado el presidente del Consorcio de Toledo, Manuel Santolaya, está compuesto por «vigas de las más antiguas de España».

Santolaya ha explicado que se trata de un «sitio excepcional» que tiene relación con el palacio de la Aljafería de Zaragoza y la iglesia de San Millán de Segovia y que incluso alguna de sus piezas, en concreto una alacena mudéjar, se encuentra en el museo británico.

Detalle de uno de los rincones de la Casa del Temple
Detalle de uno de los rincones de la Casa del Temple– LUNA REVENGA

El propietario de este antiguo palacio islámico, declarado Bien de Interés Cultural, Amador Valdés, ha asegurado que «seguramente es la casa más antigua de Toledo mejor conservada», en la que destacan sus zócalos de pinturas bícromas y sus estructuras de madera, «las mejores conservadas in situ del país», en las que han aparecido policromías que estaban ocultas tras la última restauración.

Casa del Temple
Casa del Temple– LUNA REVENGA

El propietario ha indicado que hay muchas leyendas que relacionan la Casa del Temple con la Orden de los Templarios pero ninguna oficial y ha dicho que en el siglo XIX, el historiador Amador de los Ríos ya denominó este espacio como Casa del Temple, al igual que Benito Pérez Galdós en su novela «Ángel Guerra».

Durante el siglo XIX, se conservaba además de la Casa del Temple, que ocupaba «toda la manzana», la Casa de la Parra, hoy desaparecida, que era donde se ubicaba «supuestamente la alacena del Temple», exportada a Londres tiempo después.

in ABC.es