Month: March 2018

Pentecost Benedictio Militia 2018

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Come and celebrate Pentecost in a Templar way.

The 18 – 20 May 2018 the Priory of Portugal will host a three day event that includes Conferences, Debates and a full Adoubement Ceremony with Vigil and Pentecost Benedictio Militia.

Templars from any branch of the Order are invited. Most activities (except the Vigil and short private section of the ceremony) are opened to the public, subject to pre-registration. All are welcome. More details (place, times, registration, etc.) upon request.

Request your invitation today.

 https://templarsosmthu.wordpress.com/the-order/pentecost-benedictio-militia-2018/

FAQ

Q: Who is organizing this Event?
A: The Priory of Portugal of the OSMTHU

Q: Who is the OSMTHU?
A: A branch of the Palaprat Templar Order (1804) that is organized in Autonomous Priories since 1945. You can check the provenance here: https://templarsosmthu.wordpress.com/structure-and-provena…/

Q: Is this the Templar Order of the Middle Ages or a (the) right descendant lineage of that Order?
A: No. There is no such thing. The history of the Templars is fascinating, but one thing is sure: after over 900 years of its foundation and 700 years after its suspension, no single group can make such a claim with any degree of truth. There were pockets of survival at the time and we do study what became of the Order and its project across Europe, but any claim of continuity from any group should be regarded with extreme caution.

Q: So, why are you using the Order’s name and symbols?
A: For the same reason that we still have the Olympics today. For the same reason modern Universities, Academies and other Institutions draw on their Greek and Roman predecessors: the spirit is alive and the values they stood for are still valid and very much in need in today’s world. There is no linear historical flow, but the spiritual connection and ideals can be mastered and put to use. Our Order has been doing so for over 200 years and our branch for over half a century. It’s not likely we’ll stop now!

Q: Is this connected with Freemasonry?
A: No. Freemasonry is a fraternal Order that has no direct link to the 1804 revival of the Templar Order by Palaprat.

Q: I have joined the Templars in a branch different from yours. Can I attend the event?
A: Yes. We accept Registration to the Event by every Knight or Dame that can attest affiliation to a Templar inspired Order, such as OSMTJ, OSMTH, OCMTJ, OSTI, OCE, OVDT, CBCS, KT, OSMA, etc.

Q: But I am not active at the moment. Can I still attend?
A: Once Chivalry is duly transmitted, it remains active in oneself if the values are kept. We don’t want to know about current membership status in any Order. Membership is a private matter for each individual. We only need to validate that Chivalry was transmitted so that we can open the access to the private part of the ceremony to those who wish to attend it.

Q: I am not a member of any Templar Order. Can I attend?
A: The general public can Register and attend the Event. The only exception is part of the Vigil (that starts around 9pm on Saturday and ends around 8am the next morning). New Knights and Dames need to be secluded and in silence and meditation during that period. The ceremony ends with the doors of the church opened to the public and the celebration of Mass and Eucharist at 9am on Sunday.

Q: Apart from the Ceremony, what else will take place?
A: There will be a Conference and Debate on Friday night and Saturday afternoon, with several guests speaking on “Conflict and the Notion of the Just War”. There will be a Gala Lunch on Saturday where attendees, members and invited guests, will network and get to know each other. The start of the Vigil, around 6pm and up to 9pm will take place in the church and will be opened to the public. Doors close at 9pm and only Knights and Dames may remain then. Doors will reopen at 9am on Sunday allowing the public to witness the completion of the Ceremony and Mass. In all, there are three days of conferences, debates, talks and ceremonies.

Q: I’m not a member of a Templar Order. Can I become a Knight (or Dame) during the Event?
A: No. The Pentecost Benedictio Militis is a ceremony that closes a cycle that was opened when the members that are going to be Knighted were received as Novices quite a while ago. The Order is not accepting novices during Pentecost.

Q: Where will the Event take place?
A: It will take place In the country of Portugal, in a small medieval village relatively close to the capital, Lisbon.

Q: Why don’t you disclose the location?
A: To avoid unwanted attention in a very special spiritual occasion, the location is only disclosed to Registered participants. The Event will take place in a village conveniently accessible from the main Portuguese airport, featuring good accommodation and historically rich surroundings.

Q: What language will be used during the Event?
A: Portuguese and English.

Q: How much does it cost to attend?
A: Further information should be requested via email to osmthu@mail.com

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A Knight’s Tale

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Paddy Houlihan from Ballybeg is maintaining and promoting an almost forgotten site of significant historic interest – the Knights Templar Graveyard, Kilbarry.

AN IMPORTANT piece of Waterford’s history and heritage is being preserved and promoted thanks to the Trojan efforts of one local man and his granddaughter.

In a fantastic display of community spirit and pride of place, Paddy Houlihan from Ballybeg Square embarked on a project to improve the condition of the Knights Templar Graveyard in Kilbarry some years ago.

Paddy had become increasingly concerned for the condition of the graveyard which is located near Lacken Road Business Park and Templars Hall.

The Knights Templar were an international military order set up to protect pilgrims travelling to the Holy Land.

They arrived in Ireland in the late 1100s after the Norman invasion of 1169-71 and the witnessing of an Irish charter by Matthew the Templar in 1177.

They fell out of favour with the King of France in 1307, were persecuted on the continent and closed down in England and Ireland.

Their estates were handed over to their rivals, the Knights Hospitaller, but Kilbarry was one of three preceptories in Ireland retained for the Templars for the remainder of their lives.

The remains of the church of St Barry are located within the Kilbarry Knights Templar Graveyard.
Beside the church, a row of mortared stone buildings with slate roofs were located along with a row of large wooden buildings, probably barns.

Records show that the church, which was located on a slope overlooking a tidal marsh that extended to the River Suir, was in good repair until 1615 when it was still in use and serving the parish. The earliest headstone in the graveyard dates back to 1598 and the latest is dated 1856.

The graveyard lay more or less idle since the mid-1800s and, in the modern era, was believed by many to have been a famine graveyard.

Paddy Houlihan says many local people, including himself and his family, have many fond memories of playing in the area. He recalls the graveyard being a favourite location in which to explore with his brothers and sisters when growing up. “Everybody around this side of the city played in the area,” he explained.

In recent years, Paddy became concerned because of the huge growths of ivy throughout the graveyard, the high grass growths, and the many overhanging trees.

Along with his granddaughter Katie (his trusted sidekick and ‘Project Manager’), they spent countless hours engaging in efforts to clean-up the graveyard. More than 40 headstones/tombstones are located in the graveyard and, during the duo’s work, five tombstones were uncovered which had been hidden in the undergrowth. All of the names on the stones have now been recorded, and the graveyard’s condition has improved immensely.

in munster-express.ie by Kieran Foley

Last Supper: What Wine Was Served at Jesus and the Apostles’ Final Meal?

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The Bible offers a pretty comprehensive answer to the question ‘WWJD?’: what would Jesus do? But, as Christians observe Easter and the Last Supper another question arises: what would jesus drink?

To answer this question, the location and timing of the final meal that Jesus had with his disciples before he was crucified is key. And three of four of the accounts of Jesus’ life in the Bible – known as the Gospels – suggest that it took place on the last Thursday celebration of Passover in around AD 30,  Father Daniel Kendall, Professor of Theology and Scripture at the University of San Francisco told wine app Vivino.

“Unlike John the Baptist, Jesus drank wine,” explains Father Kendall, adding: “From the descriptions it was most likely a Seder meal. Since it was and is the most important of Jewish feasts, wine would have been part of the festivities.”

While grape varieties may not have been named and identified as they are now, wine had been made in this part of the Middle East since around 4000 BC.

Archaeological evidence suggests that around the time of the last supper, rich, concentrated wines were popular, says Dr Patrick McGovern, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and director of Biomolecular Archaeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia.

In Judah more specifically – near Jerusalem where the Last Supper is said to have taken place – archaeologists have found a jar inscribed with: “wine made from black raisins”. This means that winemakers may have used grapes dried on the vine or in the sun on mats to create sweet, thick drinks. At sites nearby in the region, jars labelled “smoked wine” and “very dark wine” have also been found.

While it was common to water down wine at the time, there was a taste in Jerusalem for rich, concentrated wine, according to Dr McGovern.

Spices and fruits – including pomegranates, mandrakes, saffron and cinnamon – were used to flavour such wines, and tree resin were added to help preserve them. So, the wine drank at the Last Supper, then, might resemble the mulled wine some of us drink at Christmas.

Today, comparable bottles would include Amarone, which is made in Northern Italy with grapes dried on straw mats.

While it’s unclear exactly which wine Jesus drank at the last supper, Dr McGovern jokes: “If someone can find me the Holy Grail and send it to my lab, we could analyse it and tell you.”

in The Independent

The historical reality of the Templars of ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and ‘Assassin’s Creed’

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The planning was meticulous. Signed and sealed, laden with accusation and instruction, the letters were sent by the king to local authorities throughout his realm. They were to act exactly one month later, simultaneously and at the crack of dawn — on a Friday the 13th, as it happened. The targets were unaware of what lay in store, their leader even spending time with the king and seeming to enjoy his favor. The hour came, and armed men launched their surprise, summarily carrying off hundreds to the king’s dungeons, and many ultimately to their deaths. It was a performance reminiscent of a Stalinist purge or Hitler’s Night of the Long Knives.

The year was 1307, and the month was October. The king was Philip IV of France. And his victims were all members of the order of “the Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and the Temple of Jerusalem,” better known as the Knights Templar — or simply the Templars. Over a period of two centuries, this charitable and military order of Crusaders had grown in power and wealth. At a stroke, and with the acquiescence of a weakened pope, Philip destroyed the order, imprisoning its leaders and burning many at the stake. “God will avenge our death,” said James of Molay, the last Grand Master, as he faced the flames on an island in the Seine.

And, in a way, God has. The Templars live on in popular culture — from the video game “Assassin’s Creed” to Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code.” Philip IV does not.

Dan Jones, the author of well-regarded histories of the Plantagenets and the Wars of the Roses, obviously gives no credence to the conspiratorial fantasies that have been spun around the Templars over the years. No, they do not guard the Ark of the Covenant or the Holy Grail, and never did. No, a surviving remnant does not protect the identities of the descendants of Jesus and Mary Magdelene. No, the order does not secretly run the world — that’s the Trilateral Commission or maybe Skull and Bones. In “The Templars,” Jones relegates this curious afterlife to an epilogue. His aim is to present a gripping historical narrative, and in this he succeeds.

The raw material is rich. Founded by a French knight in 1119, after the successful First Crusade, the Templars began with a mission to protect throngs of pilgrims now traveling to the Holy Land. The members of the order wore white robes with a distinctive red cross, embraced personal poverty and lived according to a regime codified by the great Cistercian abbot Bernard of Clairvaux. A papal charter was followed by a papal decree granting the Templars an exemption from taxes and local laws, effectively creating a transnational entity whose members could go anywhere. As Jones describes it, the order comes across as a combination of Blackwater, Goldman Sachs, Kroll International, FedEx, Fort Knox, Bechtel and, well, the Red Cross.

The financial acumen of the Templars was considerable. In the post-“Da Vinci Code” era, visitors to London often make their way to the Temple Church, between Fleet Street and the Thames, built in the mid-12th century. The circular nave — typical of Templar churches — is the oldest part of the structure and was used as a repository by English nobles and by the Crown itself. “By the 1240s,” Jones writes, “the order was providing diverse financial services to some of the richest and most powerful figures across Christendom.” The Templars “guaranteed debts, ransomed hostages and prisoners of war on credit, and could arrange very large loans — such as the one made in 1240 to Baldwin II, the emperor of Constantinople, and secured by his very own fragment of the True Cross.”

The order’s military record was mixed. In 1187, an army of Templars and others, under King Guy of Jerusalem, was surrounded and slaughtered by the sultan Saladin in his successful campaign to restore Palestine to the Muslim fold. Saladin had played his hand skillfully: stopping up wells even as he enticed the Christians farther into the searing flats; pausing long enough to allow dehydration to take its toll; then moving in for the kill. Some 200 Templars were captured, and Saladin beheaded them all.

That was an unhappy episode, but the Templars had another century of influential life in front of them, until that Friday the 13th in 1307. Philip IV was pious, paranoid, unscrupulous and mercurial — and deeply in debt to the Templars. It was all too easy to manufacture charges of heresy, blasphemy and sexual depravity: urinating on the cross, having sex on the altar — the usual allegations. The power and secretiveness of the Templars only fueled the charges. The decisive blow was struck in France, but within a few years the Templars were extinct throughout Christendom, except in the popular imagination.

“The themes of the Templar story resonate powerfully today,” Jones observes. He rightly does not pontificate about this and draws no specious parallels, but the reader can’t help recognizing familiar territory. There is the preoccupation in the West with what we now call the Middle East. Religions collide and atrocities abound. Cries of “Allahu akhbar” pierce the din of battle. The power of states is threatened, or seen to be threatened, by unaccountable forces with global tentacles. Information is unreliable and easily manipulated, allowing conspiracy theories to take root and spread.

Nothing is left of the Templars except words on parchment and ruins in stone. An older crusading order with certain similarities, the Knights Hospitaller, does still exist, after a fashion — its genetic progeny are the Knights of Malta. They have a palatial headquarters on the Aventine in Rome. They have a papal charter and enjoy quasi-sovereign status. They can issue their own passports. They maintain diplomatic relations with a hundred countries. And, like the Templars, they do not rule the world.

By Cullen Murphy in The Washington Post